eLife Enhances Open Annotation with Hypothesis to Promote Scientific Discussion Online

Who says neuroscientists don’t need more brains? Annotation with SciBot

You might think that neuroscientists already have enough brains, but apparently not. Over 100 neuroscientists attending the recent annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (SFN), took part in an annotation challenge: modifying scientific papers to add simple references that automatically generate and attach Hypothesis annotations, filled with key related information. To sweeten the pot, our friends at Gigascience gave researchers who annotated their own papers their very own brain hats. But handing out brains is not just a conference gimmick. Thanks to our colleagues at the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF), Hypothesis was once again featured at SFN, the largest gathering of neuroscientists in the world, attended by well over 30,000 people in San Diego Nov 12-16, 2016. The annotation challenge at SFN was a demonstration of a much larger collaboration with NIF: to increase rigor and reproducibility in neuroscience by using the NIF’s new SciBot service to annotate publications automatically with links to related materials and tools that researchers use in scientific studies.

By |2017-11-14T18:04:56-08:00January 31st, 2017|

Annotating to extract findings from scientific papers

David Kennedy is a neurobiologist who periodically reviews the literature in his field and extracts findings, which are structured interpretations of statements in scientific papers. He recently began using Hypothesis to mark up the raw materials for these findings, which he then manually compiles into a report that looks like this:     The report [...]

By |2017-05-30T10:12:29-07:00December 15th, 2015|
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