Mark Up the Margin: AnnotatED Workshop at OLC Accelerate 2020

Mark Up the Margin: AnnotatED Workshop at OLC Accelerate 2020

By |2020-11-19T14:51:31-08:00October 30th, 2020|
Annotate with Flower Darby, Accelerate Keynoter: her headshot and an OLC Accelerate 2020 logo.

The Online Learning Consortium’s Accelerate 2020 conference happens 6–18 November 2020. Attending Accelerate could be the single best thing you can do to enrich your understanding of online learning this year. You’ll come away from it equipped with innovative teaching practices and tools from a community of educators dedicated to making online education highly effective, engaging, and ever-evolving.

To kick off the annual conference, Hypothesis held a free workshop on collaborative annotation with members of AnnotatED on Friday 6 November. This fun hands-on event was designed to spark ideas and generate practical takeaways for using collaborative annotation in the classroom.

The workshop is over, but all the resources from it are available here in this post. You didn’t have to register for OLC Accelerate to take part in our annotation workshop, but there are so many great reasons to attend the full conference, recordings from which are available to registrants for a whole year after the conference ends. Check out our suggested schedule for OLC Accelerate below.

Workshop program

Getting on the same page: Collaborative annotation for social reading: what is it, and how are people using it to enrich online learning? (20m) Facilitated by Jeremy Dean, VP Education, Hypothesis
Notes from the field: Hear from a variety of AnnotatED community members about how collaborative annotation is happening at their schools and discuss your ideas and questions with these experienced practitioners. (40m) AnnotatED Presenters

  • Mary Klann, Historian and Lecturer, UC San Diego
  • Matthew Salomone, Associate Professor, Mathematics, Bridgewater State University
  • Remi Kalir, Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver
Discussion, annotated: Join us in a hands-on activity to explore, discuss, and augment readings on topics central to the Accelerate 2020 program and our professional development as educators. Practice reading together to see how collaborative annotation can build understanding, connections, and community. Our conversations will be anchored in texts — literally — and spread out to engage other texts, ideas, and people beyond the workshop itself. (60m) We read and annotated a text selected by Accelerate keynoter Flower Darby related to the themes of her opening keynote on 9 Monday November 2020 and closing plenary on 18 November 2020.

You can also join the annotated conversation on “Student Speak 2020: Student Voices Informing Educational Strategies,” by GlobalMindED in partnership with Every Learner Everywhere and The Equity Project.

Workshop resources

Watch the full workshop recording below or on YouTube, annotate the video transcript while you watch, and get the workshop slides. Follow links below to specific parts of the recording. We’ve also pulled out the links shared in chat below so you don’t have to go hunting for that reference you missed.

Getting on the same page with Jeremy Dean, Hypothesis: Collaborative annotation for social reading: what is it, and how are people using it to enrich online learning?

Notes from the field: Hear from a variety of AnnotatED community members about how collaborative annotation is happening at their schools and hear participants discuss ideas and questions with these experienced practitioners (listed in order of appearance):

  • Mary Klann, Historian and Lecturer, University of California San Diego
  • Matthew Salomone, Associate Professor, Mathematics, Bridgewater State University
  • Remi Kalir, Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver

Discussion, annotated: A hands-on activity to explore, discuss, and augment readings on topics central to the Innovate 2020 program and our professional development as educators. Participants prepared to annotate with this guide, and you can too because more annotations are still welcome: Engage in Events with Hypothesis Collaborative Annotation

Suggested OLC Accelerate 2020 schedule

Beyond the workshop, join us for the full Accelerate program, where folks from Hypothesis will be part of multiple sessions. We’re really excited about the conference this year, in particular all the emphasis on social learning: the idea that people learn better together. There’s a growing movement to extend the capabilities of social learning across all activities of teaching and learning, especially reading — still an essential foundation for learning. If you are excited about social learning too, use these suggested sessions to build your own conference schedule.

Register for OLC’s Accelerate 2020…they’ve taken care to reduce attendance costs for this all-virtual event at a time when everyone’s budget is challenged and all session recordings will be available to registrants for a whole year after the conference ends.

Fri 6 Nov
10am–12pm ET
Free Workshop: Mark Up the Margin: Collaborative Annotation for Social Learning (this page)
Join educators from AnnotatED, the community dedicated to extending collaborative annotation as a transformative practice in teaching and learning. Get your own hands-on experience with annotation and hear how social reading is being used at different schools to enable student success.
Mon 9 Nov
11:15am–12:15pm ET
Teaching Excellence + Technology Innovations: Empowering Students to Engage and Learn
Flower Darby, a scholar and an author on online teaching and learning, calls on us to combine great teaching with great technology to help our students engage more fully and learn more effectively.
5:15–5:45pm ET Coffee Talk With Hypothesis: Researching EdTech’s Impacts with Ethical, Collaborative Investigations
We love to explore new tools and practices to improve teaching and learning, but how do we know what effects they really have? Join a conversation with Dr. Remi Kalir, the first Scholar in Residence at Hypothesis, to talk about ways we can investigate connections between student experience and changing technologies and pedagogies with ethics as a priority.
Thu 12 Nov
2:15–3pm ET
Making Reading Active, Visible and Social with Hypothesis Annotation
Learn how you can add collaborative annotation activities to teaching and learning in any discipline to enable students to engage with course materials, teachers, ideas, and each other in deeper, more meaningful ways. Get the slides from this session.
Wed 18 Nov
12–12:45pm ET
Closing Plenary Address
Flower Darby, a scholar and an author on online teaching and learning, closes Accelerate 2020.

We’re looking forward to connecting with all the talented educators from far and wide at Accelerate 2020 who will be sharing research and the latest learning innovations coming down the conveyor belt of great ideas. Break out of your quarantine: despite Accelerate being virtual this year, there are all kinds of sessions to connect with other people every day where you can meet up with old friends and new.

Let’s connect at this year’s Accelerate.

About Hypothesis

Hypothesis is a mission-driven organization dedicated to the development and spread of open, standards-based annotation technologies and practices that enable anyone to annotate anywhere, helping humans reason more effectively together through a shared, collaborative discussion layer over all knowledge. Hypothesis is based in San Francisco, CA, USA, with a worldwide team.

Hypothesis has developed its open-source annotation software in collaboration with many partners and funders, including specific projects to augment groups and authentication capabilities with eLife, to enable annotation on EPUBs with NYU, the Readium Foundation, Evident Point, and EPUB.js, and many others. We thank our funders, partners and community for working with us to advance standards-based, interoperable annotation for all.

Contacts

Media: Nate Angell, Director of Marketing
Twitter: @hypothes_is
Web: web.hypothes.is